In: New York City Laws

Beginning October 1, 2017, pursuant to Local Law 86 of 2017, the regulations regarding providing heat during the nighttime hours have changed. During the Heat Season (October 1 – May 31), property owners must maintain an indoor temperature of 62 degrees inside all apartments at all times.

The former outdoor temperature trigger of 40 degrees outdoors is no longer in play and heat will now always need to be provided. This is also a 7 degree difference inside, as the old regulations provided for the landlord to provide heat to 55 degrees inside when the temperature fell below 40 degrees outside.

If the inside temperature falls below 62 degrees, tenants may file a complaint about inadequate heat with 311. Please take necessary action to ensure that your heating system will be provide heat according to the law beginning October 1st. Daytime heat must still be provided at a minimum of 68 degrees once it is below 55 degrees outside and hot water must be still be maintained at 120 degrees.

In what can be a sign of things to come in the future of New York City’s continuing fight against Airbnb’s short-term rentals, the New York State Senate recently passed a bill that would make it illegal to advertise any short-term rentals (short-term is classified as anything less than 30 days) for entire homes on their website.

(more…)

As per NYC Department of Environmental Protection Code, Buildings in New York City are now required to perform a tune up/overhaul and efficiency test on an annual basis by a certified technician. In addition, it is now required that all buildings keep a log book of maintenance of the boiler. The super must sign this book weekly. If this maintenance and testing is not performed by the end of each calendar year, the building will be subject to a fine.

(more…)

As per the yearly requirement in New York City, properties that are greater than three (3) units need to file their annual property registration with HPD. As of today, the filings for 2016 – 2017 are available to update on the HPD website.

(more…)

Beginning on May 15th and lasting until June 25th, the NYC Department of Buildings will be inspecting decks and retaining walls for free, for property owners who request this service. During the assessment, inspectors will check both decks and retaining walls, if applicable, for potentially dangerous conditions, such as cracking, rotting, bulging, leaning and other warning signs that they note can lead to potential structural failure.

(more…)

New York City’s Department of Buildings has issued a new regulation for buildings with elevators in 2016. Effective January 1st of this year, the DOB is now requiring buildings to inspect and maintain their elevator machine brake every year. Not only is the brake to be inspected, but the building is now required to document and properly tag the elevator brake.

(more…)

As per NYC Law any building that was constructed prior to January 1, 1978 is required to send out Lead Paint Notices to occupants each January. Should a child reside in the unit who is under the age of six (6) years old, the building is required to inspect that particular unit at least one (1) time per year, at any time in the year.

(more…)

Local Law 47 of 2015 was put into place in October 2015 for one specific purpose; to ensure that building owners and landlords were advising their tenants of any upcoming outages of hot water, electricity, gas or heat that will have a duration of more than two hours.

(more…)

Effective September 3, 2015, New York City will have amended their City Human Rights Law (N.Y. City Admin Code Sec. 8-107(24)) to preclude employers from utilizing consumer credit reports and credit history as a basis for hiring decisions. Essentially, most employers will no longer be allowed to run credit reports or obtain credit history from applicants. Employers can also not use this information, if received, as a basis for hiring or not hiring an applicant.

(more…)

On May 6, 2015, Mayor DeBlasio signed into law, Local Law 39 of 2015 (Intro 433 of 2014), which states that all multifamily buildings are required to maintain electrical outlet safety and tamper resistant receptacles in public areas (with the exception of public parts of the building that are used exclusively for mechanical or storage purposes).

Compliance of this law can be done in a few ways. Buildings can choose to install electrical outlets that are listed as tamper-resistant receptacles, in accordance with New York City electrical code, or they can install and maintain protective caps, covers or other safety devices over outlets. Failure to abide by the new law after August 4th will result in a building receiving a Class A violation.

If you have any questions on the implementation of this program and do not want to use protective caps, it would be in the building’s best interest to speak with a licensed and insured electrician to begin the process of installing tamper-resistant receptacles in all common areas of your building.